The big surprise of my first Project Scorpio tech briefing? That’s obvious: the fact that Microsoft has managed to push GPU frequencies all the way up to 1172MHz – far higher than anything we’ve seen from any current-gen console. When the silicon architects first revealed this spec point, I wondered how the hardware team had managed to achieve desktop PC-level GPU clocks in a console-sized form factor. “You’ve not seen the form-factor yet,” replied Microsoft’s Kevin Gammill wryly. Heading the second briefing in a packed day is Leo Del Castillo, General Manager of the Xbox Hardware team, responsible for overseeing every piece of Xbox hardware and peripheral the firm has produced. It takes a few minutes for me to fully register what’s happening as the meeting progresses, but he’s essentially building a Project Scorpio console right in front of me. From processor to motherboard to chassis to final form-factor, the building blocks of a retail console are slowly come together as the briefing continues. Of course, it starts with the Scorpio Engine itself – six teraflops of processing power, seven billion transistors, packed o...