Roof shingles represent an important chapter in the evolution of roofing materials. Up until the middle of the 19th century, wood and slate shingles or clay tiles were commonly used for roofing in Australia and elsewhere. Roofs were also laid by covering the surface with fabric or heavy paper, which was then coated with tar and sprinkled with sand for long-term protection. The process was further simplified with the introduction of paper pre-coated with tar and sand. The roof shingle, as we know it today, owes its origin to the inventiveness of Henry Reynolds, a roofing contractor from Grand Rapids, Michigan who cut up the tar-coated paper into rectangular pieces in 1903 to create asphalt shingles. Asphalt shingles continue to be a popular roofing choice in the building industry. Having evolved considerably since their introduction in the market at the turn of the 20th century, asphalt shingles today feature a fibreglass mat as the base layer coated with asphalt and ceramic granules. These roof shingles score high on wind and impact resistance, waterproofing, fire performance, style, appeal and affordability. However, there are several different types of roof shingles with mater...